Dr. Irina Brokhman – Helping the Body Heal Itself

Dr. Irina Brokhman has been a healer ever since she worked as a registered nurse in an Israeli hospital. Today, as Lab Director of Galea Professional Medical Inc. – a private sport medicine clinic in Toronto – Brokhman is on the cutting edge of technologies that allow the body to heal itself.

 

“After completing my PhD in the BIU Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Science, I did post-doctoral research at the University of Toronto,” Brokhman recalls. “My laboratory experience with adult stem cells – undifferentiated cells found throughout the body – led to my current investigation of how products derived from a patient’s own blood can improve tissue healing and regeneration.” Brokhman supervises R&D for Dr. Anthony Galea, a consultant to the Olympics as well as professional athletic teams, who is one of the top-rated sports medicine physicians in the world.

 

Brokhman explains how personalized, regenerative medicine can get injured athletes back onto the playing field – fast. “Traditional sports injury treatment relies on RICE – Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation – and anti-inflammatory drugs,” she says. “But we can make healing faster and more effective through the localized injection of self-extracted platelets and stem cells.  Anchored in place by a tiny amount of fat also extracted from the patient, this minimally-invasive procedure jump-starts the medicinal signaling necessary for natural tissue repair.” 

 

Belarus-born Brokhman – who made aliya in 1990 – has been fascinated by developmental biology ever since her Masters at Tel Aviv University. For her doctorate, however, Brokhman says that Bar-Ilan University was the obvious choice.

 

“My PhD supervisor, BIU Prof. Ron Goldstein, is a recognized leader in the stem cell field,” she says. “I believe that stem cell-based therapies have great potential, not just for sports medicine, but also for the treatment of currently incurable diseases. Through my research, I hope to help these technologies become part of standard medical practice.”